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Dear all,

Martin Baumann, professor for the Study of Religions at the Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Lucerne (Switzerland), informed us today that the new issue of the Journal of Global Buddhism is out. The issue is packed with exciting research articles, among others on “Buddha at Eranos” and “on Buddhist Culture Wars” in North America. Check it out at: https://www.globalbuddhism.org/

Best wishes
Almut

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Dear all,

We would like to bring to your attention the launch of the electronic Journal of Gandhāran Buddhist Texts. The main objective of this peer-reviewed journal, which is hosted by the University of Sydney, is to make available ‘threshold’ editions of Gandhāran textual materials more quickly and in a dynamic and interactive manner. The journal is in part a response to the enormous amount of new Gāndhārī and Sanskrit manuscripts and inscriptions from the Greater Gandhāran region that remain unpublished, and in part a response to the desire to make that material available in a more comprehensive form than is not possible in conventional print publications. The editorial board is made up of scholars working in the field: https://gandhari-texts.sydney.edu.au/journal/.

The first three articles provide digital editions of sutras from the Robert Senior collection of Kharoṣṭhī manuscripts:

  • Aṇatvalakṣaṇa-sutra (RS22.02), a Gāndhārī version of the second discourse of the Buddha known in Pali as the Anattalakkhaṇa-sutta, by Mark Allon, Stephanie Majcher, and Ian McCrabb: Link.
  • Suhadukha-sutra (RS20.01), a Gāndhārī sutra without an exact parallel, by Joe Marino: Link.
  • Mahaparaḍaha-sutra (RS20.02), a Gāndhārī version of the Pali (Mahā)-Pariḷāha-sutta, by Joe Marino: Link.

The journal which is edited by Mark Allon, Paul Harrison and Richard Salomon invites submissions of textual material (manuscripts, inscriptions, etc.) from the Greater Gandhāran region. Guidelines for submission, with various options for authors to onboard their texts into the journal are available upon application. 

For further details, contact Mark Allon: mark.allon@sydney.edu.au.

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Hello everybody,

This is a brief update on what has been happening after I received my Ph.D. in East-West psychology from California Institute of Integral Studies. First, I spent a year in St Mary’s Medical Center in San Francisco for my residential internship in psycho-spiritual service as a Buddhist chaplain. Then, I was a teaching fellow with the East Asian Studies program of Harvard University, where I had gotten my M.A., and I chaired the Harvard Buddhist Community.

Back in China, I founded the Beijing Clear-Orientation Center for Counseling and Meditation of which I am the director today. My main work for the past ten years has been integrating psychotherapy with Buddhist practice especially meditation practices. I am deputy director and research fellow of the Hebei Research Institute of Chan Buddhism in China, deputy secretary and board member of the International Transpersonal Association, an international affiliate of American Psychological Association, and a member of International Zen Therapy Institute, a member of Chinese Society of Psychology.

Since 2009 I also have been honing on the theory and practice of the meditation-initiated integrative therapy (MIIT) and its updated version known as Grounding and Communicating as an Integrative Therapy. Currently I provide individual and group counseling as well as workshops and training programs in China and internationally.

I case you would like to read something I have written, I have published more than 30 papers in psychology, meditation and Buddhism, comparative religion in China and internationally. Among them are the pieces below.

Cheers,
ZHU Caifang (Jeremy)

(more…)

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Dear all,

I have just received permission from my publisher to share my new book about Buddhism in Spain, a brand new new-release. The book can be downloaded from the zenodo platform: http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4572509

You can share it with whoever you think might be interested, as it is freely available. It has two chapters in English, an introductory update on Buddhism in Spain and a presentation of some Vajrayana monasteries and retreat centres in Spain. The rest is written in Spanish.

I very much hope you will find my new book interesting!

Cheers,
Paco

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This is to inform you that the new issue (Vol 30, no. 2) of the International Journal of Buddhist Thought and Culture (IJBTCI) is now available in print and online (all downloadable without cost) at http://ijbtc.dongguk.edu/

IJBTC is a peer-reviewed, academic journal published bi-annually in English language by the Academy of Buddhist Studies at Dongguk University, Korea. It is indexed in Thomson Reuters’ Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), the American Theological Library Association’s Atla Religion Database, and the Korea Citation Index (KCI). The journal aims to advance the study of Buddhism, its diversity of thought and culture that historically spread over the regions of Asia and has now expanded to all parts of the world. In addition, IJBTC endeavors to expand the diverse voices and perspectives in the academic study of Buddhism by featuring research from all parts of the world. In particular, it seeks to introduce scholarly investigations from regions outside the traditional centers of Buddhist study in Asia and the West.

In the spirit of expanding the study of Buddhism, IJBTC highly encourages research articles that explore new perspectives and methods while not disregarding the long and rich tradition of Buddhist studies. The journal welcomex submissions of original research including proposals for special issue publications fitting to the scope and interests of the journal. Moreover, reviews of English and non-English books, films, and other published works on Buddhism are accepted. IJBTC is published bi-annually in June and December and accepts submissions throughout the year.

For more details, click here.

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Hello everybody,

In my academic life, I am a professor of Buddhist Philosophy in Dialogue with other World Views at VU University in Amsterdam. In my Buddhist life, I am a Zen teacher in the Chinese Chan tradition (Maha Karuna Chan in the Netherlands). I received dharma transmission from my teacher Ton Lathouwers in 2013.

In my new book, Reimagining Zen in a Secular Age, I offer an account of the exciting but also problematic encounter between enchanted Japanese Zen Buddhism and secular Western modernity over the past century, using Charles Taylor’s magnum opus A Secular Age as an interpretative lens.

As the tenuous compromises of various forms of “Zen modernism” are breaking down today, new imaginings of Zen are urgently needed that go beyond both a Romantic mystical Zen and a secular “mindfulness” Zen. As a Zen scholar-practitioner, I show that the Zen philosophy of the 13th century Zen master Dōgen offers much resources for new hermeneutical, embodied, non-instrumental and communal approaches to contemporary Zen theory and practice in the West.

All the best,
André van der Braak

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© John Whalen-Bridge

Hello everyone,

Greetings from the English Language and Literature Department of National U of Singapore! I’m currently working on engaged Buddhism and American writing, and I’m researching the authorized biography of Maxine Hong Kingston, a Buddhist American writer. In recent years I’ve also written “Tibet on Fire: Buddhism, Protest, and the Rhetoric of Self-Immolation.” With Andrea Pinkney I co-edited “ Religious Journeys in India: Pilgrims, Tourists, and Travelers,” for which I wrote an essay on Buddhist pilgrimage in the Dharamshala area.

Take care,
John Whalen-Bridge

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We are pleased to inform you that the first book to focus on Buddhist Tourism in Asia is now available and on sale through the University of Hawai’i Press. This innovative work, edited by Courtney Bruntz and Brooke Schedneck, explores how Buddhists, government organizations, business corporations, and individuals in Asia participate in re-imaginings of Buddhism through tourism. Contributors from religious studies, anthropology, and art history examine sacred places and religious monuments as they have been shaped and reshaped by socioeconomic and cultural trends in the region.

Following an introduction that offers the first theoretical understanding of tourism from a Buddhist studies’ perspective, early chapters discuss the ways Buddhists and non-Buddhists imagine concepts and places related to the religion. Case studies highlight Buddhist peace in India, Buddhist heavens and hells in Singapore, Thai temple space, and the future Buddha Maitreya in China. Buddhist tourism’s connections to the state, market, and new technologies are explored in chapters on Indian package tours for pilgrims, thematic Buddhist tourism in Cambodia, the technological innovations of Buddhist temples in China, and the promotion of pilgrimage sites in Japan. Contributors then situate the financial concerns of Chinese temples, speed dating in temples in Japan, and the diffuse and pervasive nature of Buddhism for tourism promotion in Ladakh.

For more information, click here.

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Dear all,

We are pleased to announce the publication of

Buddhism after Mao: Negotiations, Continuities, and Reinventions,
co-edited by JI Zhe, Gareth FISHER and André LALIBERTÉ. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2019, 364p.

Temple in Shanghai, April 2015

With well over 100 million adherents, Buddhism emerged from near-annihilation during the Cultural Revolution to become the largest religion in China today. Despite this, Buddhism’s rise has received relatively little scholarly attention. The present volume, with contributions by leading scholars in sociology, anthropology, political science, and religious studies, explores the evolution of Chinese Buddhism in the post-Mao period with a depth not seen before in a single study. Chapters critically analyze the effects of state policies on the evolution of Buddhist institutions; the challenge of rebuilding temples under the watchful eye of the state; efforts to rebuild monastic lineages and schools left broken in the aftermath of Mao’s rule; and the development of new lay Buddhist spaces, both at temple sites and online. Through its multidisciplinary perspectives, the book provides both an extensive overview of the social and political conditions under which Buddhism has grown as well as discussions of the individual projects of both monastic and lay entrepreneurs who dynamically and creatively carve out spaces for Buddhist growth in contemporary Chinese society. As a wide-ranging study that illuminates many facets of China’s Buddhist revival, Buddhism after Mao will be required reading for scholars of Chinese Buddhism and of Buddhism and modernity more broadly. Its detailed case studies examining the intersections among religion, state, and contemporary Chinese society will be welcomed by sociologists and anthropologists of China, political scientists focusing on the role of religion in state formation in Asian societies, and all those interested in the relationship between religion and social change.

For more information, click here.

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Dear All,

We would like to introduce to you a recent contribution to the field of the studies on the globalization of religions, The Hybridity of Buddhism: Contemporary Encounters between Tibetan and Chinese Traditions in Taiwan and the Mainland, edited by Fabienne Jagou (Paris: EFEO, 2018). The articles published in this volume are the result of a three-year project entitled “Practices of Tibetan Buddhism in Taiwan” (2012–2015), funded by the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchanges. The collection adopts the concept of hybridity as the principal model of investigation of the continuities and ruptures in the practices of Tibetan Buddhism, both on a global level and in interaction with the local religious traditions of Taiwanese and Chinese societies.

To read more, click here.

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